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HomeDruid, Posts Ogham and Gods


Ogham and Gods

Erin

Okay, as promised: First the picture of the ogham sticks I carved.

The entire Ogham carved on to oak twigs last night.

And now the report:

“CROM CROICH

Also known as Cenn Crûach (Bloody Head) Crom-Cruaghaûr (The Great Creator) Crom Dubh (Dark, Bent One) Crom Cruach, Crom Crûich (Bloody Crescent) Crom Darail and Crom Derûil (Bent One of the Mound, The Little Nut) Soo ny Braih, Soo ny Hoarn (John Barleycorn)

A god called “the Bent one of the Mound” who was, according to multiple sources, worshiped in many different ways who was bloodthirsty rites, to the point where worshipers died in observing the rites attributed to him. A god who was bansihed when Patrick exorcised it and the fall of Druidism on the Isle. A God who had 12 sub-gods to join him in his tribute. This is, however, bound up in the story of Patrick and his driving of the Druids out of Ireland.

The actual breakdown of his name is this: Crom Cruaich means “crooked-mound”. Cruach is a common adjective meaning bloody or gory, derived from Cru’ blood or gore.

According to the reference at members.tripod.com/~deanjones/crom.html, Lughnasaad is his holiday, also known as “Crom’s Sunday”. Apparently, also, crying “Dar Crom” is like crying “by Jove”, meaning that it’s simply an exclamation of surprise, simmilar to Conan’s “By Crom!” exclamation. Which, come to think of it, is possibly where it came from, according to a reference at http://www.folklegend.com/article1072.html .

According to The Encyclopedia Mythica (www.pantheon.org/articles/c/crom_cruach.html) he was an idol of Irleand. Apparently, the classical definitions of this god, backed up to a point with Charles Squires in Celtic Mythology, on Samhain one third of the children were sacraficed to him to ensure the continuation of the crops and the land’s fertility. I think, however, that this is mixed up with the Standing Stones of Ireland. The evidence is that they are deleniating him, in this entry, as an idol, and that there were 12 other idols encircling this god along with the constant referral of this entry as an “it”, saying that Patrick cursed it and it sunk into the ground. There is also a mention that this god was never part of the active Irish Pantheon, for which we can all be thankful I’m sure. The place name for where this god was at is Mag Sleach or “The plain of adoration or prostration”.

From what I’m seeing, he was a local god. Although there was apparently a reference where Zelysium chief of the Tuatha de Dannan called for continual opposition to Crom Cruach (http://www.fictician.com/dragons/lawandlore/religion/crom-cruach.jsp) This reference seems to be more complete than others, but it also seems to be somewhat paranoid. It states that Crom Cruach has come back and will destroy us if we are not careful. It also says that the Nemedians are the ones who were doing the adoring, which no other source specificed. There also seems to be a connection to the harvest in his archetype, as shown by the sacrafice of 1/3 of the children to ensure a good harvest. This source also says that it was the Tuatha de, not Patrick, who finally banished him forever, as he was a problem to the Nemedians and the Firbolg.

There is a story at http://www.lorgaine.com/site_html/mythos_folder/portraits/crom_cruach.html

Finally, the best reference I found was at http://www.folklegend.com/article1072.html. There just does not seem to be that much about this deity, and I didn’t want to write the same article again.

Daven”

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