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HomeMy Articles Introduction and First Post


Introduction and First Post

Erin

First published on “The Juggler”

Well, I have been an admirer of this blog for some time now, and I finally asked if I could be on the contributers. Now, here I am.

I’m Daven and I have a small site called Daven’s Journal. I do articles, blog posts, reviews of books that I have read and, oh yeah, I have a few classes that you can take on there, free, that go beyond “Wicca 101”. I’m a Druid and a Seax-Wican of 14 years now, administrator of a few communities and author. I’m also a father of a beautiful 12 year old daughter.

But that’s enough about me.

What I want to comment on is Rove. All I see online from various people and parties is Rove, Rove, Rove. I have received five emails from various action committees that I subscribe to, all calling for Rove’s resignation.

In these emails there are links to various petitions and email forms that I can, with just a few clicks, send my electronic words to my congress-critters and tell them what I think.

There is one HUGE problem with these: flooding a congressional office with emails tends to get them ignored. No, really, they don’t pay the slightest attention to them.

I live in Tennessee. That means Senate Majority Leader Dr. Bill Frist is one of my Senators. No, I didn’t vote for him. There he sits in his office or on the Senate floor, obsessively checking his email for me to tell him what I think about this topic or that topic. Right? That’s what’s happening, isn’t it?

Not even hardly.

I hate to tell you this, but more than likely Senator Frist has probably hired someone (or better yet appointed an intern who doesn’t get paid) to sift through his email, condense it and send back email forms. Outlook is really good at sending back auto responses to people, and I expect to get an email any day now saying “thank you for contacting Senator Frist on this topic. Rest assured that he will keep your opinion in mind when he votes next.” Which means that he not only didn’t see it, but his staff person didn’t even read my email, other than to make a tick on a list of “how many” they got this day.

What this ultimately means is that these emails from the action committees don’t matter at all. They are simply statistics. They are numbers in a book, and easily deleted. And I was told so by a friend on my personal blog who doesn’t think these things make any difference.

But here’s the thing, and there’s really no getting around it. Each of those tick marks represents a person. Each time they get an email from “True Majority” calling for them to take an action, someone had to fill out the form putting their name on it. Therefore this spam email that the office just received (because there’s no way to justify it as anything else) represents a person who agrees with the content.

They may not read the email for your passionate plea, but they will add a tick to the “no” column.

Get enough of those, and it becomes significant. If those ticks add up to be a percentage of the 4,500,000+ people of voting age in Tennessee (source) THEN the politicians pay attention. Because that percentage equals a voting block. And that voting block represents power.

When elections run somewhere in the ± 1% category (meaning that less than 50,000 people in Tennessee decide the election of a Senator), 2% of the population all sending along their thoughts on a current topic, then that becomes significant, and it may just sway how the Senator votes on a given issue.

Now, THAT’s power.

And this is why your vote counts. Your opinion counts. If you feel strongly on an issue, even if you think it’s useless to fill out one of those forms, do it anyway. Don’t sit there. I said it over and over in 2003, “If you don’t speak out, how can you be heard?” If you don’t take the time to talk to others and get involved, then how can you be listened to by those in control? How can you tell them what you want them to do if you don’t take action and make them notice you?

And the other side of that coin is this; “If you don’t vote and participate in the election process, then you can’t complain when the people put into power are not those you want there.”

This goes for ANY country that has republican elections for their leaders. It’s not just for The United States. The United Kingdom elects the Prime Minister and the Parlament. The same thing goes for them, everything I said. Same for France. Same for any democratic nation in the world, and even for some non-democratic nations as well. You have to speak out.

If we, people of conscience, continue to not speak out when we can on issues that matter to us, then we will continue to have the politicians we deserve, instead of the leadership we want.

“I love my Country, but I fear my Government” — bumper sticker

Originally posted 2005-07-13 00:40:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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