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Author Archives: Erin

ErinAll about Erin - who has written 739 posts on Erin's Journal.

An author, a Wiccan, a Druid, a Priestess, a member of the ULC, Owner of Erin's Journal, mystic, magickian, DragonKin, Guardian and Transsexual. All these and more describe Erin.

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Mabon, Celebrating the Autumn Equinox

by Kristin Madden
Llewellyn, 2002 $14.95 US
ISBN 0-7387-0090-8

Review by Daven

Rating: ★★★★☆ 

Here we are, the last book in Llewellyn’s series on the Sabbats. This book is deserving of a place on the shelves of many private libraries, next to all the other Sabbat books by Llewellyn.

In and of itself, this book is well written. The information I read is factual and accurate, complete and drawn from many cultures. It does not focus solely on one aspect of this Sabbat, but looks at many different culture’s celebrations for this time of the year. I looked for information to find fault with, and honestly I can’t find any.

Mabon starts out with information about First Harvest Festivals throughout the world, from the Greeks to Romans to India and on to modern Neo-Paganism. I appreciated the fact that an early chapter discusses Thanksgiving, one of the celebrations associated with this holiday. Not only did the author give us the “accepted” history, the one in the schoolbooks and taught in song and story, she also presents the same story from the other side of the fence, using scholarly research to back that story up. It becomes very apparent that Plymouth Rock landed on the Native Americans in the “actual” history.

Hey! Thanks so much!

I really appreciate you taking the time to write to me.  Thanks so much.  In thanks, why don’t you grab this banner for your site?  I’ll even throw in the code for you…  This is 272 by 82 pixels

This is the HTML code:

<a href=”http://davensjournal.com/index.htm”><img src=”JourBanner.gif” border=0 alt=”Daven’s Journal.  Pagan information freely available on the Internet!”></a>

Here’s another one just in case you didn’t particularly like the first one.

This one is 427 by 113 pixels.  The code for this one is:

<a href=”http://davensjournal.com/index.htm”><img src=”JourBan.gif” border=0 alt=”Daven’s Journal.  Pagan information freely available on the Internet!”></a>

And this is a “standard banner” size.  It’s 486 by 60.

<a href=”http://davensjournal.com/index.htm”><img src=”468-banner.gif” border=0 alt=”Daven’s Journal.  Pagan information freely available on the Internet!”></a>

And finally I have a button for those with limited space:

<a href=”http://davensjournal.com/index.htm”><img src=”DJButton.jpg” border=0 alt=”Daven’s Journal.  Pagan information freely available on the Internet!”></a>

I’m no good at saying “thank you” to a whole bunch of people.  Your emails let me know that I’m doing a good job and that I matter.  I’m very glad that you all are communicating with me.  It helps when I get down that I’m not reaching anyone.  I know it’s silly, but hey, I’m human too.

Beltane Sabbat

April 30

[Pronounced Bell-tan-yah. Erecting the Temple is performed. Priest and Priestess kiss. There should be spring flowers spread around the Circle and on the Altar. Also on the Altar rests the Priestess’s Crown. To one side of the Circle is a cauldron filled with kindling.]

Priestess: With this night do we see
The ending of the Dark Time.
To bring us once more to the light.
And to our Lady Freya.

All: Herne! Our thanks and our Love to Thee!

[Covener lights the kindling in the cauldron.]

Priest: Now do we light the Beltane fires!
To revitalize our Lord
After his long journey.
Welcome Woden!
Welcome Life!

All: Welcome Woden! Welcome Life!

[All now dance around the Circle, jumping over the flaming cauldron if they wish. They dance either singly or in pairs. Priestess remains at the Altar, and says, while the Coven dances;]

Priestess: The year is a mighty wheel
And the Sabbats are its spokes
As the Circle is also a wheel
Made up of we Wiccan folks.
Ahead lies now the Sun-
Lord Woden still shining down-
Whilst our Lady has begun
To spread her springtime gown.
With bud and twig and leaf and tree,
We welcome Freya so merrily.

About “bunnyhunting” trends

I know I’ve spoken at length about going out and finding the idiots in Paganism and Wicca, and exposing them for the idiots they are.  But now I want to talk about the other side of that for a while.

While I have been out of the hunting business for a while now, there are those I’m friends with who are still out there in the communities, looking and reporting on trends in the groups of the new seekers, and the responses that the older and more experienced generations are having toward them.

This is where the downside of the hunting comes in.  There is a HUGE temptation to slather ALL new people with the same “bunny brush”.  To label the sincere and genuine seeker with the “fluffbunny” title, which makes it impossible for them to thereafter find real help in their spiritual journey.

So I want to talk about this trap in this essay.

Wicca for One

By Raymond Buckland
Citadel Press Books, 2004, $14.95
ISBN 0-8065-2554-1

Review by Daven

Rating: ★★★★½ 

Long time readers of the Journal will remember that I have a really soft spot in my heart for Raymond Buckland, mainly because he’s the founder of my tradition of Wicca. I have a lot to thank him for and a lot to credit him for.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t believe that he can do no wrong. But I do believe that he gets it right more often than not.

This book, however, tends to be a rehash of many of his other books. The only thing that sets this one apart is that it is developed specifically for those who are solitary.

All the information in this book has been published before in books such as The Tree and Buckland’s Complete Guide to Witchcraft. However, those books, while being excellent sources of information, tend to be centered for those who are going toward covens. This book is modified specifically for those who will be practicing in their own backyards without others to practice with them.

The Pocket Spell Creator

By Kerri Connor
New Page Books, 2003, US $9.99
ISBN 1-56414-715-0

Review by Daven

Rating: ★★★½☆ 

This is a small book. When I got it, I didn’t think there could be much material in the book, but I was wrong. What is NOT in here is a lot of filler or commentary. What IS here is content and a lot of it. This is not a book that one can read from front to back like a “Magic(k) in 5 easy steps” book. This is a reference.

Because this is a reference, there are LOTS of chapters. Each chapter focuses on a different set of correspondences. For instance, there is a chapter detailing the correspondences for the days of the week. There are also chapters covering the magickal properties of gems, herbs, colors and so on. Each chapter is indexed. This makes information easy to find with a quick check of the table of contents, where the items are laid out in alphabetical order.

The index is brief, and does not list the contents of the book again, and the bibliography is interesting. There are about 10 books cited. I feel that books listed are good, some bad and some so-so. All of the information is well laid out and researched.

Practical Magic for Beginners

by Brandy Williams
Llewellyn, 2005 $12.95 US
ISBN 0-7387-0661-2

Review by Daven

Rating: ★★★☆☆ 

Any magic book that professes to be for beginners is one that I pay special attention to. It is very rare that someone actually writes a book that will be understood by a rank beginner in the area of Magic.

This book does a pretty good job of doing this.

As I read through this book, I was impressed by the exercises in each chapter. They were short, to the point and completely relevant. Considering that many of the exercises that are written out are almost the exact same exercises I teach and use in my classes, I was slightly concerned. As I checked though, it became quickly obvious that the exercises were listed because they work, not because they were mine. Which made me feel much better.

The additional information listed is interesting. It is advice and thoughts, explanatory material which helps the novice understand why one does things this way. It’s useful information that is needed to help those who may not know any better, and there is enough that is new to help the experienced witch or magician get a new spin on their practice.

Lesson 7: Holidays

Message: Lesson 7, part 1: Holidays
Author: Teacher – Daven Iceni

Date: Aug 25, 2000 11:17

The Truth about Enochian Magick

by Gerald and Betty Schueler
Llewellyn Publications, 1996 (48 pages, $2.99 US)
ISBN 0-87542-716-2

Review by Daven

Rating: ★★½☆☆ 

I acquired this item hoping I would not only understand the “mysteries” of Enochian Magic I also hoped to use it as a reference for my High Magick class. I must give you my first impressions on this book when I opened the package and found it.

I thought, “Someone has been to the grocery store and put this in instead of the real book, it can’t have any information in it at all.” The book measures about 7 inches by 4 inches. Barely big enough to qualify as a pamphlet much less a “book. I saw how thin it was, 48 pages, and I didn’t think it could hold any information at all.

Reading it took almost no time. I took two days to polish it off, but that was simply because I kept getting distracted by other things. I was not able to sit down and read it from front to back in a couple hours as I normally do.

This will deal with Druidic Powers

The old Druid looked out on the assembled people that he was sworn to take care of. He knew that this was his moment. He would be shining in the eyes of all the people.

He picked up his staff. Waving it over his head, he chanted in nonsense that he learned at the school “Boon kwoert franden… Sumanet frewknot potemn!” while he looked for the sure sign that the storm was about to start. To them, he knew it looked as though he were summoning the rain. But it was just mummery. He was actually doing nothing.


Many of you have read at one time or another about the supposed powers of the Druids. If you notice, in the RP threads, I limit myself to something less than what the old Druids were rumored to be able to do. This has many reasons. The primary among these is because I want my character Daven to be somewhat believable. The other reasons don’t matter now, only this one.

I do this in an attempt to portray the Druids as real people, not personages out of the Mabinogion or the Irish myth cycles. Gwydion may have been a wonder as a magician, but I believe that his powers, while not fake, were probably significantly less than what we are led to believe.