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Author Archives: Erin

ErinAll about Erin - who has written 741 posts on Erin's Journal.

An author, a Wiccan, a Druid, a Priestess, a member of the ULC, Owner of Erin's Journal, mystic, magickian, DragonKin, Guardian and Transsexual. All these and more describe Erin.

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Posts by Erin:

Hubris

What’s wrong with being new?

I see this mentioned many times on other blogs and articles, and I keep coming back to the central point of “what is wrong with being a new person in a religion?”

I know I’m pretty harsh with fluffies in this site. I don’t equate new people with fluffies however. Fluffies are those who are deliberately and willfully ignorant and revel in being that way. They go out of their way to promote and argue the ignorant and busted myths from decades ago (Wicca is ancient, 9 million, all gods are one god, etc) and they decry and flame those who have the temerity to say differently.

But being new is not the same thing. One can be fluffy and new, that’s easy. But one can also be new and be non-fluffy, in that one is willing to listen and learn. And that is listen and learn to multiple sources, not just one.

But I see people on some of the forums I’m on who go out of their way to present that they are not new. Why? I think Juliaki’s essy (referenced a few posts back) about this same problem hits a very key point, many new people are treated as fluffies.

On picking your battles

For many years I have been a part of the Community, both online and off, and seen many causes taken up and championed by those who have a passion to fight for the right. There is nothing wrong with this; I just wish they would be a little more discriminating with their causes.

Here’s one that I wish to all the Gods was passed on by the “Activists”. There was a gentleman I was familiar with in Texas while I lived there. Wonderful metalworker. He made his fillet out of the leaf spring of an old car. He beat it and shaped it and it was a work of art. He was very into nature and into survival. He was going through a messy divorce. He was Wiccan. The judge refused to let him have his child, and he alleged to the community that the mother of his child was the bad parent. The impression retained many years later is that mom was a drug addict, a convicted felon or worse. He ran with the daughter to Kansas, making it possible to charge him with felony kidnapping rather than let her be destroyed by her mother. Eventually he was found and the little girl was brought back to Texas.

Green Witchcraft II

Balancing Light and Shadow

by Ann Moura (Aoumiel)
Llewellyn Publications 1999
ISBN 1-56718-689-0

Rating: ★★★★☆ 

I received this book at the same time as I received Green Witchcraft and Green Witchcraft III and I was thrilled. It looked to be a good series of books for the beginner.

As I said in my previous review, this set of books is not for the beginner. It is for those who have the basics down as described by Cunningham and Buckland in their seminal works.

What this book does do is show how to harness the energy of the Dark side of nature. While I personally object to anything being listed as “dark” since it is all of nature, the author does have a point in that anything in the universe has a negative side to it. This negative side she lists as the “dark” side. Such as, doing spells for benefit during the New Moon.

That’s not something that many Craft teachers are willing to go into in any depth. So once again, I need to restate that I don’t believe that these particular books are good for the rank novice, but rather for the intermediate student who is looking to further their education.

Harry Potter, Narnia, and the Lord of the Rings

By Richard Abanes
Harvest House Publishers, 2005 $11.99
ISBN 0-7369-1700-4

Review by Daven

Rating: ★☆☆☆☆ 

I shouldn’t be disappointed. I knew what I was getting into. I knew this was a book about the evils of witchcraft and Harry Potter from a fundamental Christian perspective. I knew all this, but I still hoped.

I had interacted with Richard Abanes through a weblog. Specifically a discussion that ensued at Wildhunt.org. The exact thread is at “My Falacy is Made of Straw” (and I know it says “No comments”, but trust me, there are comments. Click the link and you will see them.) Yes, I know that I don’t come across in the best of light, but as you can see, there is baiting on both sides.

Well, I talked to his publisher and got a copy of the book. I read it. Man is it disappointing.

It is not that the author is a poor writer. Far from it, Richard is an engaging and convincing author. It’s not that he has his facts wrong, for I’m sure that he did the research required for this book. That information is available, and it is footnoted as well, but I didn’t have the time to go behind him and look up all the citations he states.

A Letter to a Young Girl

(Daven’s Note: This is a portion of some email correspondence I recently had with a young girl in relation to my site.  She was, basically, asking me to teach her Wicca.  In brief, I told her no, but I went further than many have in the past to tell her why I said that.  There are several legal problems and some moral/ethical issues that those of us who teach have to be aware of, and this explains them.

Please note, this does not say that she is not worthy to learn, it simply states that I can’t teach her right now.  There will invariably come a time when she is old enough to be free of parental constraints and any teacher in the Craft will be happy to teach her, but right now there are too many issues to deal with to allow me to do more than present this information to her that is on this site.  I hope she will not loose her interest as she grows.  This was written in 2002.)

Advanced Ritual Course Final Assignment

(Note from Erin: One tiny bit of information… I was taking an advanced ritual class, and this is the essay I did to complete the course.  I chose to do it on the Mormons because the instructor was also an ex-Mormon.  I am pretty proud of this piece and i believe that it stands up in the time.)

For this assignment, and with the permission of Kenn, I chose the Baptism ritual from the Mormon Church.  It’s one of the few rituals in the Mormon Church that I participated in that follows an outline similar to previous rituals discussed in this class.  I never participated in any of the “secret” rituals.  I did not choose the more common “Sacrament Ritual” also know as, bread and wine, transubstantiation, or communion, since it is so frequently done that the ritual looses all meaning in practice.

The Hero Redeemed

(A Note from Daven: The Hero Redeemed is an assignment I received from an auditor of one of my classes. This was turned in for an assignment given in the mythology lesson.)

The Hero Redeemed- An Archetypical Myth

Author: Posting for a lurker – Daven Iceni

(Daven’s Note: I received this via email today. Apparently there is a group of Non-AS residents who follow this class, and email me their assignments. So, we have auditors in the classroom, be on your best behavior. I have their permission to post this, but I was asked to keep their identity to myself.)

In the story I will be examining I have found a modern retelling of the classic myth of personal redemption. In the true Grecian style, a Deus Ex Machina is employed to resolve the conflict.

(Daven’s Comment: For those of you not familiar with the device of Deus Ex Machina [Okay, I had to look it up too.] I will explain it in brief here. It’s the device used where a benevolent Power intervenes in the story to make it “all better”. It’s “and the little boy fell out of bed and woke up, it was all a dream” cheat that drives me out of my mind.)

Bunnyhunting part 2

First Published on “The Juggler”

Many that I have talked to about this topic have expressed to me that one of the reasons they hunt bunnies are because of the PR war.

Think back to the icons that are being held up on TV and in the media as “typical witches”. You find that most of them are extremeists. People like Lady Belladona LeVeau on the recent show “Wife Swap”. AP with brooms? Fire spinning? Teaching her children how to be a HPS instead of a human being? House elves? And that’s a minor example.

How about Jonathon ‘The Impaler’ Sharkey? Remember him? He’s the “vampire” who was running for the post of Governor of Minnesota, who promised to put the Ten Commandments AND the Wiccan Rede in every government building in Minnesota, as well as impailing criminals on the Capital Lawn. He claims to be a witch and his wife is also a Pagan, according to what they say.

Everyday Magic

by Dorothy Morrison
Llewellyn Publications, 2002 $9.95 US
ISBN 1-56718-469-3
Review by Daven

Rating: ★★★★½ 

This is another of the books I wanted to look at for it’s suitability for my Magick Class. I must say, that I think this text will cut the nut.

What do I mean by that? I think that Dorothy has done an exceptional job of staying on topic and having original information for the reader.

Of note in this book is a section that many practical magickians would be thrilled to see, a section on modern twists to old spells. One example of this is her tale of how she learned to use an automatic drip coffee maker as her tool for making infusions and tinctures of herbs. She has several suggestions that many books of this kind skip. Things like why you do different magicks at different moon phases, how the time of day effects magick, the day of the week and the best explanation as to why one would do their spells in rhyme. I’ll admit that I am somewhat resistant to doing rhyming couplets in my spells and chants, but Dorothy has convinced me that it can be a powerful addition to my spell.

Religion vs. Spirituality

I was posting on another board and I realized why I hate the term “I’m a religious person”. To me it implies that the person who is saying it is more concerned with the forms of their faith than with the actual faith itself.

I’m going to use a few terms here, and before I get started I wanted to define them somewhat.

Faith: The internal connection to whatever. It is the acknowledgment that there is a spirit and that many different and various things can and do happen to that spirit after death. In this case, I am using spirit interchangably with “intellect”.

Spirituality: The internal and personal relationship with whatever deities or spirits there are in the world around you. It is possible to be spiritual and not have any worship of invisible beings.

Religion: The forms of that honoring and worship.

The religion is the institutional and ritualized form of spirituality.

This is getting scattered. I find it possible to be intensely spiritual and not be religious at all. One can have a day to day interaction with the unseen world and never do a ritual honoring that world.